The problems with rushing to legalize marijuana for stoner use in California

Los Angeles Times
By George Skelton

Californians seem hot to visit a legal pot shop and smoke a joint or munch a weeded brownie. But driving home could be risky.

No one — not even highway patrolmen — knows precisely how stoned a motorist can be before he’s dangerously under the influence of cannabis.

Unlike with liquor, there’s no 0.08% blood alcohol equivalent for marijuana. There’s not even a common Breathalyzer to measure drugged driving. And there’s nothing around the corner.

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Say no to Prop. 64

The Porterville Recorder
Editorial Board

Proposition 64 on the Nov. 8 ballot would legalize the use of marijuana for recreation purposes. We recommend a no vote.

While California appears heading toward the legalization of marijuana beyond using it for medical purposes, Prop. 64 is wrought with problems that could greatly burden law enforcement and possibly create more issues than the laws we have today against the use and possession of marijuana.

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AAA – Auto Club of Southern California recommends a ‘No’ on Prop 64

Westways
AAA of Southern California

The Auto Club opposes Proposition 64. We have a genuine traffic-safety concern related to the legalization of recreational marijuana use, including marijuana candies, foods, an concentrates. It has taken generations to educate the driving public about drinking and driving and to strengthen laws to reduce drunk driving. Proposition 64 would create new traffic-safety issues and increase the problem of impaired driving.

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No on Prop 64: State not ready to legalize marijuana

Bakersfield Californian
Editorial Board

Making a recommendation about a ballot initiative is not the same as handicapping a race. Even when the polls seem to indicate voters’ strong support, it is sometimes necessary to swim against the political tide.

And that’s what The Californian is doing with Proposition 64, the November ballot initiative that proposes to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in California.

No doubt, the recreational use of marijuana will someday — likely soon — become legal. But that day should not be today. Simply, California is not prepared to become the epicenter of the nation’s marijuana industry.

Proposition 64 was written by and for special interests — mainly major corporations and investors, who will reap billions upon billions of dollars from sales. It was not written to protect the public’s interests.

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Slick Proposition 64 is bad for public health

The Sacramento Bee
BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The War on Drugs has been a quagmire. Far too many marijuana users – particularly people of color and poor people – have been arrested and jailed.

But voters should be wary of Proposition 64, the well-funded, slickly marketed initiative on the Nov. 8 ballot to fully legalize recreational marijuana in California. Despite our concerns for social justice, we recommend holding off on this measure.

Too much of it appears commercially, rather than socially driven. It backslides from California’s leadership in the war on another product that is generally smoked – tobacco. And from stoned drivers to potent edibles that, in other states, have endangered children, it poses too many public health risks that could be headed off if we just took our time and legalized in a way that isn’t so rushed.

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Vote ‘no’ on half-baked Proposition 64

The Fresno Bee
BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD

When it comes to policy and social change, California often leads. We try new ways of tackling issues, enabling other states to see the results and then decide whether to follow, stay put or branch out on their own.

Of late, California has carried the flag forward on climate change, green energy and family leave. Our causes haven’t always been liberal, either. The Golden State was among the early adopters of three-strikes criminal sentencing laws in the 1990s.

But California should wait on legalizing marijuana for recreational use. Yes, polls show that Proposition 64 is favored by voters, especially millennials. Our recommendation is that people young and old dig deeper into this slick, well-funded initiative – and then vote “no” on their Nov. 8 ballot.

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The California Association of Highway Patrolmen Reiterate Their Strong Opposition to Proposition 64

Press Release
September 14, 2016

The California Association of Highway Patrolmen – representing the 7,900 highway patrol officers who are the front line of defense against impaired drivers on our highways – released the following statement from Doug Villars, President of the California Association of Highway Patrolmen to clear up any confusion regarding their position on Prop 64:

“Recent numbers out of Colorado show that marijuana related traffic deaths have increased almost 50 percent since 2013 which is exactly why we strongly oppose Prop 64. For the proponents of Prop 64 to say that they worked with law enforcement to craft this measure is misleading and when you see Colorado law enforcement asking for a timeout to deal with the problems they are facing it should give us all pause on this important issue. We will continue to educate media, local and state leaders, but most importantly we tell California voters that Prop 64 did NOT get it right.”

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California’s Minority Voters Reluctant To Support Recreational Marijuana Measure

KCBS San Francisco Bay Area
By Phil Matier

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Californians are just weeks away from a pivotal vote on the future of pot, but an exclusive new poll shows the cannabis race may be closer than anyone thought.

Voters approved medical marijuana use 20 years ago, now Prop 64 would legalize and tax the recreational use of marijuana. It’s one of the most controversial measures on California’s ballot this November.

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New study reveals what makes marijuana edibles most attractive to young kids

Denver Post
By John Ingold

Colorado’s new rules for marijuana-infused edibles take important steps to keep the products from being attractive to young children but also may not go far enough, a recently released study suggests.

The rules — which are being finalized and take effect in 2017 — prohibit edible pot products from being made in animal or fruit shapes. That is important because playful shapes are one of the key things that makes food alluring to kids, said Sam Méndez, the executive director of the University of Washington’s Cannabis Law and Policy Project and the author of the new report.

But Méndez’s research identified other elements — such as color, smell and taste — that also make food attractive. And those are things that Colorado’s new rules do not regulate.

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Editorial: Vote no on Prop 64

St. Helena Star
Star Editorial Board

California needs to reform its marijuana laws, but Proposition 64 isn’t the right way to do so – at least not yet.
Prop 64, one of 18 propositions on the November ballot, would legalize marijuana for recreational purposes without regulations that are needed to shield kids from marijuana-related ads and protect all of us from drivers who are under the influence of marijuana.

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