No on Prop 64: State not ready to legalize marijuana

Bakersfield Californian
Editorial Board

Making a recommendation about a ballot initiative is not the same as handicapping a race. Even when the polls seem to indicate voters’ strong support, it is sometimes necessary to swim against the political tide.

And that’s what The Californian is doing with Proposition 64, the November ballot initiative that proposes to legalize the recreational use of marijuana in California.

No doubt, the recreational use of marijuana will someday — likely soon — become legal. But that day should not be today. Simply, California is not prepared to become the epicenter of the nation’s marijuana industry.

Proposition 64 was written by and for special interests — mainly major corporations and investors, who will reap billions upon billions of dollars from sales. It was not written to protect the public’s interests.

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The California Association of Highway Patrolmen Reiterate Their Strong Opposition to Proposition 64

Press Release
September 14, 2016

The California Association of Highway Patrolmen – representing the 7,900 highway patrol officers who are the front line of defense against impaired drivers on our highways – released the following statement from Doug Villars, President of the California Association of Highway Patrolmen to clear up any confusion regarding their position on Prop 64:

“Recent numbers out of Colorado show that marijuana related traffic deaths have increased almost 50 percent since 2013 which is exactly why we strongly oppose Prop 64. For the proponents of Prop 64 to say that they worked with law enforcement to craft this measure is misleading and when you see Colorado law enforcement asking for a timeout to deal with the problems they are facing it should give us all pause on this important issue. We will continue to educate media, local and state leaders, but most importantly we tell California voters that Prop 64 did NOT get it right.”

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California’s Minority Voters Reluctant To Support Recreational Marijuana Measure

KCBS San Francisco Bay Area
By Phil Matier

SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) — Californians are just weeks away from a pivotal vote on the future of pot, but an exclusive new poll shows the cannabis race may be closer than anyone thought.

Voters approved medical marijuana use 20 years ago, now Prop 64 would legalize and tax the recreational use of marijuana. It’s one of the most controversial measures on California’s ballot this November.

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New study reveals what makes marijuana edibles most attractive to young kids

Denver Post
By John Ingold

Colorado’s new rules for marijuana-infused edibles take important steps to keep the products from being attractive to young children but also may not go far enough, a recently released study suggests.

The rules — which are being finalized and take effect in 2017 — prohibit edible pot products from being made in animal or fruit shapes. That is important because playful shapes are one of the key things that makes food alluring to kids, said Sam Méndez, the executive director of the University of Washington’s Cannabis Law and Policy Project and the author of the new report.

But Méndez’s research identified other elements — such as color, smell and taste — that also make food attractive. And those are things that Colorado’s new rules do not regulate.

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UCSF professor on whether or not to legalize marijuana

KRON Channel 4 Bay Area News
By Vince Cestone, KRON and Maureen Kelly

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Californians are just months away from having to decide whether or not to legalize marijuana for recreational use.

Medicinal pot has been legal in California for 20 years.

On Wednesday night, KRON4’s Maureen Kelly talked to a long-time public health advocate who believes that Prop 64 was written for more for big business interests than the people in this state.

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Why recreational pot legalization won’t end the black market overnight

KPCC Southern California Public Radio
By Take Two

If California’s Prop 64 passes, recreational marijuana would become legal. But legalization still won’t eliminate the black market.

That’s because new regulations will likely make marijuana more expensive and pot will still be illegal for many of California’s neighbors.

Jon Caulkins, Professor of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and the co-author of ‘Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know,’ explained more about what recreational pot legalization would— and wouldn’t— change in California.

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Would more teens smoke if recreational pot were legal?

KPCC Southern California Public Radio
By Rebecca Plevin

It’s illegal for teenagers to smoke marijuana, but 15-year-old Michael Esqueda of Brea says it’s all around him.

“I really just see it as whatever,” says Michael, who will be a junior at Whittier High School. “Like, not as a bad thing or a good thing. It’s there. I know a lot of people at my school that do it, there’s always that big group and you know, individuals.”

As Californians prepare to vote on Proposition 64, also known as the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, many are asking if teenagers’ pot use would increase if recreational marijuana were legal.

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Driving while stoned? California critics of pot initiative focus on impaired motorists Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article98944567.html#storylink=cpy

The Sacramento Bee
By Christopher Cadelago

Opponents of the fall measure to legalize recreational marijuana for California adults argued Tuesday that broader marijuana use would endanger motorists.

Speaking to The Sacramento Bee editorial board, Doug Villars, president of the California Association of Highway Patrolmen, criticized Proposition 64 for lacking an established standard such as what exists for alcohol. It’s illegal for those with 0.08 percent or more of alcohol in their blood to drive.

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Gullixson: Do we really want Santa Rosa to become the mecca for marijuana?

The Press Democrat
By Paul Gullixson

I don’t mean to be rude. But who in the world made the decision that Santa Rosa wanted to become the new Amsterdam?

Even Amsterdam doesn’t even want to be Amsterdam — or at least the Amsterdam perceived by hordes of party-minded tourists. Contrary to popular belief, the Dutch never legalized marijuana. They’ve just basically tolerated it for years and only for possession of small amounts (5 grams or less) sold in official “cannabis cafes.” But the government in recent years has been tightening the rules for these cafes, forcing many to shut down. And forget about growing it. It’s illegal. You won’t go to prison but try to grow as few as five plants and you could end up facing heavy fines and eviction.

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Tainted candy at San Francisco party likely edible marijuana

Associated Press
by Janie Har

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A special unit of the San Francisco Police Department is investigating how 19 people including a 6-year-old child could have eaten gummy candies at a birthday party that most likely were marijuana edibles, authorities said Monday.

The 19 were hospitalized Saturday, but all of them were released by Monday.

The unit is interviewing people to see if the candies were intentionally placed at the party to target children, which would be a serious crime, Officer Grace Gatpandan said at a news conference.

But she said there could have been various ways the candies ended up at the San Francisco quinceanera, a traditional 15th birthday party.

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