Ad against marijuana legalization makes accurate claims

The Sacramento Bee
BY JEREMY B. WHITE

Impaired driving and youth exposure continue to be focal points for opponents of marijuana legalization, who contend that Proposition 64 would endanger kids allured by pot brownies and motorists sharing the road with stoned drivers. A web-only ad from opponents (they have not yet purchased television airtime) advances those claims.

“Proposition 64 will allow marijuana smoking ads in prime time, and on programs with millions of children and teenage viewers. Children could be exposed to ads promoting marijuana gummy candy and brownies, the same products blamed for a spike in emergency room visits in Colorado. Fatalities doubled in marijuana-related car crashes after legalization in Washington state. Yet, in California, Proposition 64 doesn’t even include a DUI standard.”

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If California legalizes pot, will TV ads be far behind?

The Sacramento Bee
By Jeremy B. White

California was the first state to allow medical marijuana. Now, two decades later, voters are expected to be asked whether to legalize recreational use of the drug. The legalization measure headed for the statewide November ballot is the product of months of negotiations between drug-law reformers, growers and distributors, famous financiers and politicians. Here’s a primer.

As the marijuana company conceived it, the ad for pot vaping pens would have beamed into the living rooms of Coloradans watching Jimmy Kimmel one night last July.

The spot depicts people partying in a nightclub and backpacking as a voiceover suggests people are “always finding new ways to relax” and could use a way to “recreate discreetly this summer.”

But vape vendor Neos’ plans for reaching customers collided with the television network’s nervousness about recreational pot.

In legalizing recreational adult use via a 2014 ballot initiative, the people of Colorado had thrust the state into a nebulous and unprecedented legal middle ground. Voters established a new industry under the shadow of federal prohibition. With a federally granted broadcasting license at stake, the ABC affiliate planning to run the ad balked.

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Judge rules in favor of No On Prop 64 in ballot argument lawsuit

Marijuana legalization measure opens door for marijuana ads on broadcast television and children exposed to ads promoting gummy candy

SACRAMENTO, CA – Judge Chang ruled today in Sacramento Superior Court on a lawsuit brought by the backers of Prop 64 challenging several points made in the ballot arguments and rebuttal to Prop 64 – the marijuana legalization measure.

Her ruling was a resounding win for the No on Prop 64 campaign and a vindication of Senator Feinstein and supporters who charged that Prop 64 would, among other things, allow for marijuana smoking ads on broadcast television.

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California pot opponents OK to claim ads could target kids

San Diego Union Tribune
By Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A judge is editing the ballot measure language California voters will receive arguing for and against the legalization of recreational marijuana.

The judge issued amended ballot measure text Friday after each side of Proposition 64 challenged the legality of the other’s campaign arguments in court.

The Sacramento County Superior Court judge allowed proposition opponents to argue that the ballot measure could lead to televised marijuana advertisements that may include marketing of pot-laced candy and pastries aimed at children. But he softened the language, saying such ads are a possibility, not a certainty.

Judge Shelleyanne W.L. Chang also rejected opponents’ attempts to strike language from ballot literature that claims recreational marijuana will be sold only in regulated stores to customers older than 21.

Proposition 64 is on the Nov. 8 ballot.

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California initiative draws fire for opening the door to TV ads that promote pot smoking

The Los Angeles Times
by Patrick McGreevy

Nearly a half-century after tobacco ads were kicked off television in the United States, an initiative in California would take a first step toward allowing TV commercials promoting pot to air alongside advertisements for cereal and cleaning products.

Proposition 64, which is on the November ballot, would allow people age 21 and older to possess and use up to an ounce of marijuana and would allow pot shops to sell cannabis for recreational use.

The initiative also includes a provision that could someday allow cannabis sellers to advertise their products in print ads and on digital sites and radio and television stations, but would “prohibit the marketing and advertising of non-medical marijuana to persons younger than 21 years old or near schools or other places where children are present.”

Television ads are not likely to appear soon, even if voters approve the initiative. There are other impediments to pot ads hitting the airwaves in California, including the fact that cannabis is still seen by the federal government as an illegal drug.

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