A proposition to legalize pot raises DUI concerns: ‘We are going to start losing folks in astronomical numbers’

The Los Angeles Times
By Patrick McGreevy

Law enforcement leaders are warning that the state is ill-prepared to handle the reforms needed if Proposition 64 passes

The defendant told an LAPD officer he had smoked pot five hours before he was pulled over on Melrose Avenue for driving erratically. A blood test found a significant level of the chemical THC in his system, and a drug recognition expert ruled he was too impaired to drive safely.

But a Los Angeles County Superior Court jury deadlocked on whether the young, off-duty valet had committed a crime by driving under the influence of marijuana, which he said he smokes for back pain and anxiety.

Similar outcomes are being seen all over California by law enforcement officials who say an initiative that would legalize recreational use of pot fails to properly address the issue of drugged driving.

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No on Prop. 64: Stand up for kids

The San Diego Union Tribune
By William Gore & James Labelle

Proposition 64, which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, is being portrayed by supporters as nearly without cost to our society. But from a law enforcement and health care perspective, that’s just not the case.

Proposition 64 is a step backward instead of forward for California’s progress in public health. It’s confounding that on the same ballot voters are being asked to both expand marijuana use and to curb the smoking of cigarettes.

Law enforcement has some real concerns about Proposition 64 based on what has happened in Colorado.

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Ad against marijuana legalization makes accurate claims

The Sacramento Bee
BY JEREMY B. WHITE

Impaired driving and youth exposure continue to be focal points for opponents of marijuana legalization, who contend that Proposition 64 would endanger kids allured by pot brownies and motorists sharing the road with stoned drivers. A web-only ad from opponents (they have not yet purchased television airtime) advances those claims.

“Proposition 64 will allow marijuana smoking ads in prime time, and on programs with millions of children and teenage viewers. Children could be exposed to ads promoting marijuana gummy candy and brownies, the same products blamed for a spike in emergency room visits in Colorado. Fatalities doubled in marijuana-related car crashes after legalization in Washington state. Yet, in California, Proposition 64 doesn’t even include a DUI standard.”

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AAA – Auto Club of Southern California recommends a ‘No’ on Prop 64

Westways
AAA of Southern California

The Auto Club opposes Proposition 64. We have a genuine traffic-safety concern related to the legalization of recreational marijuana use, including marijuana candies, foods, an concentrates. It has taken generations to educate the driving public about drinking and driving and to strengthen laws to reduce drunk driving. Proposition 64 would create new traffic-safety issues and increase the problem of impaired driving.

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