U.S. Drug Enforcement Administrators issue letter to Governor Brown

Re: Proposition 64

Dear Governor Brown,

As former heads of the Drug Enforcement Administration, we write to ask you, the State’s highest level and most visible political leader, to take a position on Proposition 64 before the election next Tuesday. For the reasons set out below, we urge you to oppose Prop 64. Your voice, Governor, is critical.

As you know, Prop 64, if passed by the voters, will legalize the commercial cultivation, production and sale of marijuana in California. It is useful to look at how this experiment with commercial legalization has worked out in Colorado, the first state to do so. The results of the Colorado experiment are troubling.

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No On Prop. 64; we don’t need more stoned drivers on roads

Daily Bulletin
By Senator Dianne Feinstein and Donny Youngblood

Six years ago, Laura Cupples’ 24-year-old son Ryan was killed when his friend’s car hit a tree on San Vicente Road in Ramona, and plunged into a ravine. Ryan’s friend was high on marijuana at the time of the crash.

The legalization of recreational marijuana could significantly increase the number of stoned drivers on our roads — fatal marijuana-related accidents doubled in Washington and Colorado after they legalized recreational marijuana.

Avoidable tragedies like the death of Ryan Cupples could become more frequent in our state and we urge Californians to vote No.

Proposition 64 is poorly written, with gaping loopholes that would exacerbate negative public health and safety consequences.

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Colorado Governor Urges Caution on Legal Marijuana

No On 64 Campaign

On 60 Min Interview – He calls on states considering legalization to collect data and wait a couple of years

“I urge caution. My recommendation has been to go slowly and probably wait a couple years and let’s make sure we get some good vertical studies to make sure that there isn’t a dramatic increase in teenage usage, that there isn’t a significant increase in abuse like while driving,” he tells LaPook. “We don’t see it yet…but we don’t have enough data to make that decision.”

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El Dorado County Board of Supervisors oppose Proposition 64, marijuana legalization initiative

Yuba Net.com
By El Dorado County

El Dorado County Board of Supervisors meeting, the Board voted unanimously in favor of a resolution opposing the passage of California Proposition 64. Proposition 64 would legalize the recreational use of marijuana for adults aged 21 years or older in the State of California.

In opposing the proposition, the Board of Supervisors cited, in a resolution, evidence that marijuana use and secondhand exposure pose health risks, including increased risk for cancer, heart attack, stroke, reproductive toxicity, respiratory impairment, long-lasting detrimental changes in brain function, and increased risk of addiction. In addition, the Board has concerns about the accessibility to teens, as the full effects of marijuana use on their short and long term health are still unknown.

The Board of Supervisors follows the American Academy of Pediatrics in its opposition to the proposition due to the potential harm marijuana could have to children and adolescents. In addition, the California State Sheriffs’ Association has issued a position statement opposing efforts to legalize recreational marijuana. Marijuana remains a Schedule I drug under the federal Controlled Substances Act and is defined as having a high potential for abuse.

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Sheriff Mims, religious leaders argue against pot legalization

Fresno Bee
By Jim Guy

Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims joined several other public safety officials and religious leaders Tuesday to urge a vote against Proposition 64, the marijuana legalization initiative on the Nov. 8 state ballot.

At Harvest of Harmony International Church in northwest Fresno, the sheriff cited marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington state as examples of how legalization had increased crime, endangered public safety and increased traffic fatalities.

“Legalization will increase our quality of life issues,” Mims said.

Bishop Ron Allen, founder of the International Faith Based Coalition, said marijuana legalization would be especially detrimental to people of color.

“If marijuana is legalized, it will be in underserved areas of communities,” he said. “Imagine marijuana stores next to liquor stores. Why would we want to hurt our youth for money?”

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Pot measure not up to snuff on regulation

Ventura County Star
Editorial Board

Recreational marijuana use by adults is, in all probability, going to be legal in California. The Star Editorial Board supports that goal but does not believe this year’s legalization initiative, Proposition 64, sufficiently establishes regulatory controls over this explosive new industry…

…But this proposition is alarmingly vague when it comes to controls over this new industry.

As opponents have correctly pointed out, this measure is not really about legalization of marijuana in California. It is about commercialization of marijuana.

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Local faith leaders speak out against legalizing recreational marijuana

FOX 40 News
By Ben Deci

It’s a bright Thursday morning. Beneath a hand-painted plywood marquee that reads “Love Thy Neighbor Church Of God” a coalition of church leaders gathered in Del Paso Heights to rally against legal recreational pot…

…”Do you want to keep your community high and lethargic? Money isn’t worth it, my friend. Look at Del Paso Heights. And if you’d have come earlier you could smell the marijuana in this community already. So we need our city council member, and our mayor-elect to do something that’s going to be good for the community, and not good for the government,” said Bishop Allen.

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Voters, Prop. 64 approach a flawed way to legalize pot

The Desert Sun – Part of the USA Today Network
The Desert Sun Editorial Board

California voters will decide Nov. 8 whether to make recreational marijuana use legal for adults.

While lighting up is increasingly accepted and possible now via wide illegal availability or through the by-prescription medicinal structure, legalization has been tried before at the ballot box and failed. We believe this effort also should fail.

Polls show legalization has majority support, but The Desert Sun Editorial Board believes this statewide ballot initiative doesn’t address key concerns, especially when it comes to public safety.

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Pot is polling high, but opponents say Colorado is a cautionary tale

The San Diego Union Tribune
By Joshua Stewart

With polls showing support for allowing recreational use of marijuana in California, Proposition 64’s opponents are urging voters to look at increased crime and traffic crashes in Colorado, a state where it’s legal to use and sell the drug, as a cautionary tale.

“California would be falling into a pit hole, falling into a ditch,” Bishop Ron Allen, the founder of the International Faith Based Coalition, said at a news conference Tuesday.

Since voters legalized marijuana there in 2013, traffic-related marijuana deaths have increased by 48 percent, emergency room visits by 49 percent, and marijuana-related poison center calls by 100 percent, according to a letter provided by No on 64 from Denver District Attorney Mitchell Morrissey.

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No on Prop. 64: Stand up for kids

The San Diego Union Tribune
By William Gore & James Labelle

Proposition 64, which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, is being portrayed by supporters as nearly without cost to our society. But from a law enforcement and health care perspective, that’s just not the case.

Proposition 64 is a step backward instead of forward for California’s progress in public health. It’s confounding that on the same ballot voters are being asked to both expand marijuana use and to curb the smoking of cigarettes.

Law enforcement has some real concerns about Proposition 64 based on what has happened in Colorado.

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