Sheriff Mims, religious leaders argue against pot legalization

Fresno Bee
By Jim Guy

Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims joined several other public safety officials and religious leaders Tuesday to urge a vote against Proposition 64, the marijuana legalization initiative on the Nov. 8 state ballot.

At Harvest of Harmony International Church in northwest Fresno, the sheriff cited marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington state as examples of how legalization had increased crime, endangered public safety and increased traffic fatalities.

“Legalization will increase our quality of life issues,” Mims said.

Bishop Ron Allen, founder of the International Faith Based Coalition, said marijuana legalization would be especially detrimental to people of color.

“If marijuana is legalized, it will be in underserved areas of communities,” he said. “Imagine marijuana stores next to liquor stores. Why would we want to hurt our youth for money?”

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We can do better than Prop. 64

OC Register
By Jamie Kerr

I believe California can do better than Proposition 64. California deserves better. While I hope that California eventually legalizes marijuana (cannabis) for recreational use, 2016 is not the right year for the conversation and Proposition 64 is not the right initiative.

It may seem surprising that a 7-year locally-compliant cannabis dispensary operator would oppose an initiative to legalize cannabis. However, I am not just a cannabis industry operator; I am also a small business owner, a civil servant and policy analyst. From these perspectives, my view on the issue of cannabis legalization is different than many might expect. I am in support of eventually legalizing cannabis for adult-use in California as, in general, I think doing so can be good policy. However, I do not support legalization unconditionally.

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Pot measure not up to snuff on regulation

Ventura County Star
Editorial Board

Recreational marijuana use by adults is, in all probability, going to be legal in California. The Star Editorial Board supports that goal but does not believe this year’s legalization initiative, Proposition 64, sufficiently establishes regulatory controls over this explosive new industry…

…But this proposition is alarmingly vague when it comes to controls over this new industry.

As opponents have correctly pointed out, this measure is not really about legalization of marijuana in California. It is about commercialization of marijuana.

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Local faith leaders speak out against legalizing recreational marijuana

FOX 40 News
By Ben Deci

It’s a bright Thursday morning. Beneath a hand-painted plywood marquee that reads “Love Thy Neighbor Church Of God” a coalition of church leaders gathered in Del Paso Heights to rally against legal recreational pot…

…”Do you want to keep your community high and lethargic? Money isn’t worth it, my friend. Look at Del Paso Heights. And if you’d have come earlier you could smell the marijuana in this community already. So we need our city council member, and our mayor-elect to do something that’s going to be good for the community, and not good for the government,” said Bishop Allen.

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Voters, Prop. 64 approach a flawed way to legalize pot

The Desert Sun – Part of the USA Today Network
The Desert Sun Editorial Board

California voters will decide Nov. 8 whether to make recreational marijuana use legal for adults.

While lighting up is increasingly accepted and possible now via wide illegal availability or through the by-prescription medicinal structure, legalization has been tried before at the ballot box and failed. We believe this effort also should fail.

Polls show legalization has majority support, but The Desert Sun Editorial Board believes this statewide ballot initiative doesn’t address key concerns, especially when it comes to public safety.

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A proposition to legalize pot raises DUI concerns: ‘We are going to start losing folks in astronomical numbers’

The Los Angeles Times
By Patrick McGreevy

Law enforcement leaders are warning that the state is ill-prepared to handle the reforms needed if Proposition 64 passes

The defendant told an LAPD officer he had smoked pot five hours before he was pulled over on Melrose Avenue for driving erratically. A blood test found a significant level of the chemical THC in his system, and a drug recognition expert ruled he was too impaired to drive safely.

But a Los Angeles County Superior Court jury deadlocked on whether the young, off-duty valet had committed a crime by driving under the influence of marijuana, which he said he smokes for back pain and anxiety.

Similar outcomes are being seen all over California by law enforcement officials who say an initiative that would legalize recreational use of pot fails to properly address the issue of drugged driving.

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No on Prop 64: Just too many risks and unknowns

The Press Democrat
BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Give Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom credit. He speaks with passion, particularly on issues of social justice. And, to him, that’s what Proposition 64 is all about.

During a meeting with The Press Democrat Editorial Board Tuesday, Newsom said of the 8,800 arrests for non-violent marijuana felonies last year, a disproportionate number of them involved African-Americans and Latinos: “We are still arresting and incarcerating folks that don’t look like me.”

It’s a compelling argument, one that underscores many of the inequalities of the criminal justice system. But it’s not enough to warrant the acceptance of a poorly worded ballot proposition that opens the door to a number of social problems and unknowns — and potentially puts local growers at a competitive disadvantage in a world where the recreational use of marijuana is legal.

We accept that legalization is probably an inevitability in California. But this is neither the right time nor the right proposition to make that happen. Here are several reasons why.

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No on Prop. 64: Stand up for kids

The San Diego Union Tribune
By William Gore & James Labelle

Proposition 64, which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, is being portrayed by supporters as nearly without cost to our society. But from a law enforcement and health care perspective, that’s just not the case.

Proposition 64 is a step backward instead of forward for California’s progress in public health. It’s confounding that on the same ballot voters are being asked to both expand marijuana use and to curb the smoking of cigarettes.

Law enforcement has some real concerns about Proposition 64 based on what has happened in Colorado.

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Ad against marijuana legalization makes accurate claims

The Sacramento Bee
BY JEREMY B. WHITE

Impaired driving and youth exposure continue to be focal points for opponents of marijuana legalization, who contend that Proposition 64 would endanger kids allured by pot brownies and motorists sharing the road with stoned drivers. A web-only ad from opponents (they have not yet purchased television airtime) advances those claims.

“Proposition 64 will allow marijuana smoking ads in prime time, and on programs with millions of children and teenage viewers. Children could be exposed to ads promoting marijuana gummy candy and brownies, the same products blamed for a spike in emergency room visits in Colorado. Fatalities doubled in marijuana-related car crashes after legalization in Washington state. Yet, in California, Proposition 64 doesn’t even include a DUI standard.”

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