No on Prop. 64: Stand up for kids

The San Diego Union Tribune
By William Gore & James Labelle

Proposition 64, which would legalize the recreational use of marijuana, is being portrayed by supporters as nearly without cost to our society. But from a law enforcement and health care perspective, that’s just not the case.

Proposition 64 is a step backward instead of forward for California’s progress in public health. It’s confounding that on the same ballot voters are being asked to both expand marijuana use and to curb the smoking of cigarettes.

Law enforcement has some real concerns about Proposition 64 based on what has happened in Colorado.

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Why recreational pot legalization won’t end the black market overnight

KPCC Southern California Public Radio
By Take Two

If California’s Prop 64 passes, recreational marijuana would become legal. But legalization still won’t eliminate the black market.

That’s because new regulations will likely make marijuana more expensive and pot will still be illegal for many of California’s neighbors.

Jon Caulkins, Professor of Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and the co-author of ‘Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know,’ explained more about what recreational pot legalization would— and wouldn’t— change in California.

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Oceanside supports medical marijuana but not recreation use

The Coast News Group
by Promise Yee

OCEANSIDE — On Wednesday the Oceanside City Council voted 4-1 to draft a resolution to oppose Proposition 64, which allows statewide recreational use of marijuana.

Earlier in the year the City Council passed an ordinance to allow delivery of medical marijuana from licensed dispensaries outside the city.

Mayor Jim Wood explained the difference in the city’s point of view on uses.

“We supported medical marijuana, but we’re not open to recreational use statewide,” Wood said.

The one no vote on drafting a resolution in opposition was cast by Deputy Mayor Chuck Lowery.

Following the vote, Lowery said he talked to an intellectual property manager, business people and community organizations to gather information.

“It’s a complex issue,” Lowery said. “It’s somewhat of an overreach to expect this council to research this issue prior to voting on it.”

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Could legal marijuana make L.A.’s homeless crisis even worse?

The Los Angeles Times
by Joel Warner

Faced with an intractable and growing homeless crisis, two weeks ago, the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors made a bold and largely unprecedented move: It approved a November ballot measure that would impose a 10% tax on gross receipts of medical marijuana as well as recreational marijuana businesses, if statewide legalization passes at the polls, to help fund the estimated $450 million a year the county needs for homeless housing and services.

It didn’t take long for the measure to face criticism. The Los Angeles Times’ editorial board worried that the levy, combined with other taxes imposed on recreational marijuana, “could push up the price of pot so much that customers and suppliers return to the black market” — defeating the purpose of legalization in the first place.

But there’s also a philosophical question to ponder: Cigarette “sin taxes” usually go to anti-smoking efforts. Casino taxes fund gambling-addiction programs. Why should a similar tax on cannabis go to homeless services? What does marijuana have to do with homelessness in the first place?

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CA District Attorneys Association votes to unanimously oppose Prop 64

Says the measure, “fails to give prosecutors any standard by which to measure and convict drug-impaired drivers.”

Sacramento, CA – The Board of Directors of the California District Attorneys Association (CDAA) has voted unanimously to oppose Proposition 64, which would legalize the adult use of marijuana. CDAA Chief Executive Officer, Mark Zahner, released the following statement regarding the initiative:

“This measure is poorly crafted and does nothing to help us keep dangerously impaired drivers from getting behind the wheel and injuring or killing innocent Californians on our streets and freeways. Among other flaws, Prop 64 fails to give prosecutors any standard by which to measure and convict drug-impaired drivers.

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