U.S. Drug Enforcement Administrators issue letter to Governor Brown

Re: Proposition 64

Dear Governor Brown,

As former heads of the Drug Enforcement Administration, we write to ask you, the State’s highest level and most visible political leader, to take a position on Proposition 64 before the election next Tuesday. For the reasons set out below, we urge you to oppose Prop 64. Your voice, Governor, is critical.

As you know, Prop 64, if passed by the voters, will legalize the commercial cultivation, production and sale of marijuana in California. It is useful to look at how this experiment with commercial legalization has worked out in Colorado, the first state to do so. The results of the Colorado experiment are troubling.

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No On Prop. 64; we don’t need more stoned drivers on roads

Daily Bulletin
By Senator Dianne Feinstein and Donny Youngblood

Six years ago, Laura Cupples’ 24-year-old son Ryan was killed when his friend’s car hit a tree on San Vicente Road in Ramona, and plunged into a ravine. Ryan’s friend was high on marijuana at the time of the crash.

The legalization of recreational marijuana could significantly increase the number of stoned drivers on our roads — fatal marijuana-related accidents doubled in Washington and Colorado after they legalized recreational marijuana.

Avoidable tragedies like the death of Ryan Cupples could become more frequent in our state and we urge Californians to vote No.

Proposition 64 is poorly written, with gaping loopholes that would exacerbate negative public health and safety consequences.

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Tulare Board expresses opposition to Props

The Foothills Sun-Gazette
By Paul Myers

While some voters may be wringing their hands over which way to vote, the leaders of Tulare County have firmly made up their mind on at least two propositions on the ballot this year. Last week the Board of Supervisors passed two resolutions voicing their concerns over proposition 64 and 57.

Proposition 64 decriminalizes the recreational use of marijuana. The proposition allows people aged 21 or older to possess, process, share or transport no more than one ounce of marijuana for personal consumption and not for sale. As well, it allows for people to grow no more than six plants indoors or on private property, again for personal use, and subject to reasonable local regulations.

And while the language allows for local governments the option and ability to ban commercial marijuana activities, that is not what stands in the way of the board. A Tulare County board report noted that, “The safety and well-being of Tulare County residents is of the upmost priority to the Tulare County Board of Supervisors. Studies have suggested that the legalization of medical marijuana can lead to an increase in youth addiction, impaired driving while under the influence of marijuana, respiratory issues, emergency room and hospital marijuana related admissions, and a possible increase for the underground black market distribution and sales of marijuana.”

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Sheriff Mims, religious leaders argue against pot legalization

Fresno Bee
By Jim Guy

Fresno County Sheriff Margaret Mims joined several other public safety officials and religious leaders Tuesday to urge a vote against Proposition 64, the marijuana legalization initiative on the Nov. 8 state ballot.

At Harvest of Harmony International Church in northwest Fresno, the sheriff cited marijuana legalization in Colorado and Washington state as examples of how legalization had increased crime, endangered public safety and increased traffic fatalities.

“Legalization will increase our quality of life issues,” Mims said.

Bishop Ron Allen, founder of the International Faith Based Coalition, said marijuana legalization would be especially detrimental to people of color.

“If marijuana is legalized, it will be in underserved areas of communities,” he said. “Imagine marijuana stores next to liquor stores. Why would we want to hurt our youth for money?”

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Local faith leaders speak out against legalizing recreational marijuana

FOX 40 News
By Ben Deci

It’s a bright Thursday morning. Beneath a hand-painted plywood marquee that reads “Love Thy Neighbor Church Of God” a coalition of church leaders gathered in Del Paso Heights to rally against legal recreational pot…

…”Do you want to keep your community high and lethargic? Money isn’t worth it, my friend. Look at Del Paso Heights. And if you’d have come earlier you could smell the marijuana in this community already. So we need our city council member, and our mayor-elect to do something that’s going to be good for the community, and not good for the government,” said Bishop Allen.

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Voters, Prop. 64 approach a flawed way to legalize pot

The Desert Sun – Part of the USA Today Network
The Desert Sun Editorial Board

California voters will decide Nov. 8 whether to make recreational marijuana use legal for adults.

While lighting up is increasingly accepted and possible now via wide illegal availability or through the by-prescription medicinal structure, legalization has been tried before at the ballot box and failed. We believe this effort also should fail.

Polls show legalization has majority support, but The Desert Sun Editorial Board believes this statewide ballot initiative doesn’t address key concerns, especially when it comes to public safety.

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A proposition to legalize pot raises DUI concerns: ‘We are going to start losing folks in astronomical numbers’

The Los Angeles Times
By Patrick McGreevy

Law enforcement leaders are warning that the state is ill-prepared to handle the reforms needed if Proposition 64 passes

The defendant told an LAPD officer he had smoked pot five hours before he was pulled over on Melrose Avenue for driving erratically. A blood test found a significant level of the chemical THC in his system, and a drug recognition expert ruled he was too impaired to drive safely.

But a Los Angeles County Superior Court jury deadlocked on whether the young, off-duty valet had committed a crime by driving under the influence of marijuana, which he said he smokes for back pain and anxiety.

Similar outcomes are being seen all over California by law enforcement officials who say an initiative that would legalize recreational use of pot fails to properly address the issue of drugged driving.

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Ad against marijuana legalization makes accurate claims

The Sacramento Bee
BY JEREMY B. WHITE

Impaired driving and youth exposure continue to be focal points for opponents of marijuana legalization, who contend that Proposition 64 would endanger kids allured by pot brownies and motorists sharing the road with stoned drivers. A web-only ad from opponents (they have not yet purchased television airtime) advances those claims.

“Proposition 64 will allow marijuana smoking ads in prime time, and on programs with millions of children and teenage viewers. Children could be exposed to ads promoting marijuana gummy candy and brownies, the same products blamed for a spike in emergency room visits in Colorado. Fatalities doubled in marijuana-related car crashes after legalization in Washington state. Yet, in California, Proposition 64 doesn’t even include a DUI standard.”

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The problems with rushing to legalize marijuana for stoner use in California

Los Angeles Times
By George Skelton

Californians seem hot to visit a legal pot shop and smoke a joint or munch a weeded brownie. But driving home could be risky.

No one — not even highway patrolmen — knows precisely how stoned a motorist can be before he’s dangerously under the influence of cannabis.

Unlike with liquor, there’s no 0.08% blood alcohol equivalent for marijuana. There’s not even a common Breathalyzer to measure drugged driving. And there’s nothing around the corner.

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AAA – Auto Club of Southern California recommends a ‘No’ on Prop 64

Westways
AAA of Southern California

The Auto Club opposes Proposition 64. We have a genuine traffic-safety concern related to the legalization of recreational marijuana use, including marijuana candies, foods, an concentrates. It has taken generations to educate the driving public about drinking and driving and to strengthen laws to reduce drunk driving. Proposition 64 would create new traffic-safety issues and increase the problem of impaired driving.

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