El Dorado County Board of Supervisors oppose Proposition 64, marijuana legalization initiative

Yuba Net.com
By El Dorado County

El Dorado County Board of Supervisors meeting, the Board voted unanimously in favor of a resolution opposing the passage of California Proposition 64. Proposition 64 would legalize the recreational use of marijuana for adults aged 21 years or older in the State of California.

In opposing the proposition, the Board of Supervisors cited, in a resolution, evidence that marijuana use and secondhand exposure pose health risks, including increased risk for cancer, heart attack, stroke, reproductive toxicity, respiratory impairment, long-lasting detrimental changes in brain function, and increased risk of addiction. In addition, the Board has concerns about the accessibility to teens, as the full effects of marijuana use on their short and long term health are still unknown.

The Board of Supervisors follows the American Academy of Pediatrics in its opposition to the proposition due to the potential harm marijuana could have to children and adolescents. In addition, the California State Sheriffs’ Association has issued a position statement opposing efforts to legalize recreational marijuana. Marijuana remains a Schedule I drug under the federal Controlled Substances Act and is defined as having a high potential for abuse.

Read More


Slick Proposition 64 is bad for public health

The Sacramento Bee
BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The War on Drugs has been a quagmire. Far too many marijuana users – particularly people of color and poor people – have been arrested and jailed.

But voters should be wary of Proposition 64, the well-funded, slickly marketed initiative on the Nov. 8 ballot to fully legalize recreational marijuana in California. Despite our concerns for social justice, we recommend holding off on this measure.

Too much of it appears commercially, rather than socially driven. It backslides from California’s leadership in the war on another product that is generally smoked – tobacco. And from stoned drivers to potent edibles that, in other states, have endangered children, it poses too many public health risks that could be headed off if we just took our time and legalized in a way that isn’t so rushed.

Read More


California initiative draws fire for opening the door to TV ads that promote pot smoking

The Los Angeles Times
by Patrick McGreevy

Nearly a half-century after tobacco ads were kicked off television in the United States, an initiative in California would take a first step toward allowing TV commercials promoting pot to air alongside advertisements for cereal and cleaning products.

Proposition 64, which is on the November ballot, would allow people age 21 and older to possess and use up to an ounce of marijuana and would allow pot shops to sell cannabis for recreational use.

The initiative also includes a provision that could someday allow cannabis sellers to advertise their products in print ads and on digital sites and radio and television stations, but would “prohibit the marketing and advertising of non-medical marijuana to persons younger than 21 years old or near schools or other places where children are present.”

Television ads are not likely to appear soon, even if voters approve the initiative. There are other impediments to pot ads hitting the airwaves in California, including the fact that cannabis is still seen by the federal government as an illegal drug.

Read More


Amid weed wars, stoned-driving laws still half-baked

San Francisco Chronicle
By Peter Fimrite

There are certain telltale signs that a person is stoned: bloodshot eyes, forgetfulness, ravenous late-night cravings.

But the November ballot measure that would legalize recreational pot in California says nothing about how police should detect tokers who climb behind the wheel. There’s no marijuana equivalent to the famed blood-alcohol content tests — taken by breath, blood or urine — that have planted .08 into the American consciousness.

It’s not a pressing concern for marijuana advocates, even as entrepreneurs try to develop a better sobriety test for dope smokers. But it’s a big quandary for California law enforcement officers, who are facing a question that has vexed several other states where recreational pot is legal.

California law bars driving under the influence of psychoactive substances, including weed. But with no definitive measurement for intoxication, arrests are often challenged, with officers relying on evidence like indecisiveness behind the wheel or a pungent car interior.

Read More