Ad against marijuana legalization makes accurate claims

The Sacramento Bee
BY JEREMY B. WHITE

Impaired driving and youth exposure continue to be focal points for opponents of marijuana legalization, who contend that Proposition 64 would endanger kids allured by pot brownies and motorists sharing the road with stoned drivers. A web-only ad from opponents (they have not yet purchased television airtime) advances those claims.

“Proposition 64 will allow marijuana smoking ads in prime time, and on programs with millions of children and teenage viewers. Children could be exposed to ads promoting marijuana gummy candy and brownies, the same products blamed for a spike in emergency room visits in Colorado. Fatalities doubled in marijuana-related car crashes after legalization in Washington state. Yet, in California, Proposition 64 doesn’t even include a DUI standard.”

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Slick Proposition 64 is bad for public health

The Sacramento Bee
BY THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The War on Drugs has been a quagmire. Far too many marijuana users – particularly people of color and poor people – have been arrested and jailed.

But voters should be wary of Proposition 64, the well-funded, slickly marketed initiative on the Nov. 8 ballot to fully legalize recreational marijuana in California. Despite our concerns for social justice, we recommend holding off on this measure.

Too much of it appears commercially, rather than socially driven. It backslides from California’s leadership in the war on another product that is generally smoked – tobacco. And from stoned drivers to potent edibles that, in other states, have endangered children, it poses too many public health risks that could be headed off if we just took our time and legalized in a way that isn’t so rushed.

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New study reveals what makes marijuana edibles most attractive to young kids

Denver Post
By John Ingold

Colorado’s new rules for marijuana-infused edibles take important steps to keep the products from being attractive to young children but also may not go far enough, a recently released study suggests.

The rules — which are being finalized and take effect in 2017 — prohibit edible pot products from being made in animal or fruit shapes. That is important because playful shapes are one of the key things that makes food alluring to kids, said Sam Méndez, the executive director of the University of Washington’s Cannabis Law and Policy Project and the author of the new report.

But Méndez’s research identified other elements — such as color, smell and taste — that also make food attractive. And those are things that Colorado’s new rules do not regulate.

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Editorial: Vote no on Prop 64

St. Helena Star
Star Editorial Board

California needs to reform its marijuana laws, but Proposition 64 isn’t the right way to do so – at least not yet.
Prop 64, one of 18 propositions on the November ballot, would legalize marijuana for recreational purposes without regulations that are needed to shield kids from marijuana-related ads and protect all of us from drivers who are under the influence of marijuana.

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Judge rules in favor of No On Prop 64 in ballot argument lawsuit

Marijuana legalization measure opens door for marijuana ads on broadcast television and children exposed to ads promoting gummy candy

SACRAMENTO, CA – Judge Chang ruled today in Sacramento Superior Court on a lawsuit brought by the backers of Prop 64 challenging several points made in the ballot arguments and rebuttal to Prop 64 – the marijuana legalization measure.

Her ruling was a resounding win for the No on Prop 64 campaign and a vindication of Senator Feinstein and supporters who charged that Prop 64 would, among other things, allow for marijuana smoking ads on broadcast television.

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California pot opponents OK to claim ads could target kids

San Diego Union Tribune
By Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A judge is editing the ballot measure language California voters will receive arguing for and against the legalization of recreational marijuana.

The judge issued amended ballot measure text Friday after each side of Proposition 64 challenged the legality of the other’s campaign arguments in court.

The Sacramento County Superior Court judge allowed proposition opponents to argue that the ballot measure could lead to televised marijuana advertisements that may include marketing of pot-laced candy and pastries aimed at children. But he softened the language, saying such ads are a possibility, not a certainty.

Judge Shelleyanne W.L. Chang also rejected opponents’ attempts to strike language from ballot literature that claims recreational marijuana will be sold only in regulated stores to customers older than 21.

Proposition 64 is on the Nov. 8 ballot.

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Tainted candy at San Francisco party likely edible marijuana

Associated Press
by Janie Har

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A special unit of the San Francisco Police Department is investigating how 19 people including a 6-year-old child could have eaten gummy candies at a birthday party that most likely were marijuana edibles, authorities said Monday.

The 19 were hospitalized Saturday, but all of them were released by Monday.

The unit is interviewing people to see if the candies were intentionally placed at the party to target children, which would be a serious crime, Officer Grace Gatpandan said at a news conference.

But she said there could have been various ways the candies ended up at the San Francisco quinceanera, a traditional 15th birthday party.

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After meeting Colorado governor, California Senate leader has concerns about legalizing recreational pot

Los Angeles Times
by Patrick McGreevy

A chance meeting with the governor of Colorado has left California Senate leader Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) with concerns about an initiative that would legalize the recreational use of marijuana in this state, he said Wednesday.

“I’m not there yet,” De León told reporters when asked his position on Proposition 64. “I don’t know if I am behind the times in comparison to other folks, but I still have my concerns.”

De León said that on a flight back from last month’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia he was seated next to Gov. John Hickenlooper of Colorado and the two had a long discussion about the effect of a pot legalization measure approved in that state. The governor had opposed legalization, and said last year that his state’s decision to approve it in 2012 was a “bad idea.”

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